Snapshots

Snapshots

 

Coffee, 9:15am

Opening Remarks, 9:25am

Claire, Shannon Susan March2016 009

Organizers: (from left) Claire Meldrum, Susan Hroncek, Shannon Maguire
Panel 1: Marginalized Voices, 9:30am
Chair: Jenny Kerber
Tanis, Ben, Amanda March2016 015
1. Benjamin Lefevre, “Young Canada: Toward a Theory of the Represented Child”
2. Amanda Spallacci, “Resistance and Healing: The Representation of Sexual Violence through Personal Testimony”
3. Tanis MacDonald, “Clear and Other Cuts: AIDS Narratives and the Deep Woods” 

 

Panel 2: Indigenous Literature and the North, 10:40am
Chair: Jing-Jing Chang

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1. Jenny Kerber, “Cat Trains and Chattering Teeth: Literary Traces of Worker Experience in the Wartime North”
2. Rebekah Ludolph, “Humour, Intersubjectivity, and Indigenous Female Identity in Anahareo’s Devil in Deerskins”
3. Shannon Maguire, “’White Noise,’ Métis Hospitality: Noise, Transmission, and Translation in Marilyn Dumont’s A Really Good Brown Girl and The Pemmican Eaters”

 

Featured Researcher, 11:45am
Chair: Lynn Shakinovksy

Eleanor Ty, University Research Professor, 2015-2016

thumb_IMG_2435_1024“Asian fail:  Failure and Unhappiness in Asian North American Narratives”

Lunch, 12:15pm

Interlude: Sanchari Sur, “not being rude” & “gulab jamuns”

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Panel 3: Specialist Studies in English and Film, 1:00pm
Chair: Ken Paradis
1. Claire Meldrum, “The Mystery of the Missing Sleuth: Female Investigative Strategies in Anna Katharine Green’s The Mill Mystery”
2. Susan Hroncek, “Bringing the Fetish Stuff Up to Date:” Invisible Alchemy at the Fin de Siecle
3. Anton Bergstrom, “Sacred Calling as Estrangement in Donne’s ‘To Mr. Tilman after he had taken orders’”
4. Mike McCleary, “Ray Harryhausen and the Aesthetics of High Imperfection”

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Alisha Salvador’s Essay Chosen for Publication

Alisha Salvador (2016) is thrilled that the final paper she wrote for EN 252 Multiculturalism and Literature, taught by Dr. Mariam Pirbhai, will be published by LUJA: Laurier Undergraduate Journal of the Arts.

Alisha Salvador '2016
Alisha Salvador ‘2016

Alisha explains:

My final paper was titled “Omnivore Perspectives of Food and Cultural Identity” and as the title suggests, it explores the relationship between food and one’s individual and cultural identity. As I was researching for additional articles to use in my paper, I came across Fischler’s “Incorporation Principle” and “Omnivore’s Paradox.” Fischler’s “Incorporation Principle” suggests how our physical features, behaviours, and identity are products of the food we consume. The “Omnivore’s Paradox” takes this principle one step further, and presents humans as ‘omnivores’ that tend to either embrace or fear the “incorporation” of other cultural cuisines based on the appreciation of either ethnic diversity or purity. I argued that throughout the novel Digging to America, Anne Tyler uses the leitmotif of food to illustrate instances of the “Omnivore’s Paradox” during intercultural encounters between two families, the Yazdans and the Donaldsons. This paper required a lot of time and effort due to the complexity of my chosen topic. I hope my paper will inspire students to challenge themselves and their writing abilities, to not be afraid of asking for help or utilizing the resources around them, and to develop a new understanding about the relationship between food and cultural identity.

The Laurier Undergraduate Journal of the Arts “demonstrates the very best talent our student body has to offer in our measured opinions and our informative expertise… taking part will improve your writing skills through our review process, impress graduate committees when applying, and support the student community by demonstrating the highest standards of academic skill.”

WIR serves up Stone Soup, March 10th

Hayden taylor Stone soup

It’s March already and each winter term, I see how quickly our time with our Edna Staebler Writer in Residence zooms by. Our 2016 Staebler WIR, fiction writer and playwright Drew Hayden Taylor, has been at Laurier since mid-January and will give his second public talk on Thursday, March 10, in The Hawk’s Nest at 7:30 p.m. Many people remarked after Drew’s first talk in January that he is a remarkable performer, speaking entirely without notes about his start as a writer, his years with Native Earth Performing Arts, and writing for film and television.

Don’t miss this second talk, which will feature Drew’s discussion of his writing process.

And for the origin of “stone soup,” check out the folk tale:

http://www.extremelinux.info/stonesoup/stonesoup.html

stonesoup

Alumni Update: Priscilla Galvez

Priscilla Galvez

Honours Communications and Film Studies ’13
“I was intimidated by the uncertainty of pursuing a career in a competitive industry such as film and television so I initially enrolled in the Film Studies program as a solid second choice to film school—a safe bet. But my program ended up being the perfect foundation for my career in film. The program broadened my knowledge of film history and genre, exposed me to the formal language of cinema, its use as a social and political medium, and its hands-on editing course cemented my passion in filmmaking and motivated me to pursue film production after graduation. In the end, my experience was integral in supplying me with the foundational tools that has helped me become a well-rounded filmmaker and producer working in the industry today.” Priscilla is an Associate Producer at Blue Ice Pictures in Toronto and, currently, is producing and directing a dark comedy web-series, “How to Buy A Baby,” about an infertile couple going through fertility treatments. Check out the series teaser .

Read about Priscilla’s web series about infertility in The Cord.