Carina Rampelt, Gold Medal Winner, Faculty of Arts

 

Rampelt

Congratulations to Carina Rampelt who was awarded the Faculty of Arts Gold Medal for Academic Excellence at the Spring convocation 2017.

Carina has great memories of her time at Laurier:

I recently graduated from WLU with a BA in English and French. I really enjoyed my time at Laurier; being able to spend four years of my life focused on something I’m so passionate about was definitely an incredible opportunity, and I’m happy to say that I met some of my closest friends in the English program. I think looking back, what stands out to me about the past four years are the little things—quiet library mornings, events at Veritas, long Blueprint production days, and late night study sessions with friends. Those were the daily rhythms of my time at Laurier, and I think it’s those familiar patterns that I’m going to miss the most. Where I’m headed this next year is a bit of a tricky question—even though I applied and was accepted to several graduate programs, I ended up deciding to take a year off before pursuing any further studies. For now, I’m doing a lot of freelance work, volunteering, and daydreaming about possible travel plans…not to mention applying to “real” jobs in my spare time. Maybe I’ll be back at Laurier (or elsewhere!) for my master’s next year.

We wish you all the best, Carina.

 

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Tanis MacDonald Wins Teaching Award

Tanis-June-2015

The Canadian Creative Writers and Writing Programs has presented Professor Tanis MacDonald with the 2017 Robert Kroetsch Teaching Award.

In keeping with Robert Kroetsch’s legacy in Canadian letters and teaching, this award is presented annually to a creative writing teacher who displays an exceptional example of creative writing theory and practice (including implementation and outcomes). The award of $1,000 is for demonstrated innovation(s) in areas including pedagogy, method, design, curriculum, assessment, technologies, learning techniques.

Tanis MacDonald’s submission was “Process Installation: Opening Up Revision in the Classroom.” She notes that the first audience members for this material were the students of EN370: Creative Writing: Poetry in Fall 2016 for whom the material, and the sample poem “The Haunting,” were originally created.

Congratulations, Tanis MacDonald!

 

Departmental Award Winners 2017

Congratulations to all the students in English and Film Studies who have won departmental awards and scholarships this year! The list of award recipients is as follows:

Campbell/Verduyn Prize for Film: Grace Jansen In De Wal    

Jim Clark Prize for Drama: Brittany Lazar

Chris Heard Memorial Writing Prize: Danielle LeDuc

Pauline Carole Leavine Scholarship in English: Caroline Weiner, Erin McHarge

Hugh MacLachlan Scholarship: Lindsay Meaning

Barbara Parker Memorial Scholarship: Danielle LeDuc, Denise Springett

Princess Cinema Award: Amanda Mckelvey

Flora Roy Scholarships: Erin McHarge, Aaron Rupert, Carina Rampelt

Paul Tiessen Scholarship in Film: Emily Sider

Weldon and Misser Prize in Poetry: Sarah Best

Michael Daly Wins Eric Hoffer Award

Laurier English grad (2006) Michael Daly’s first book, The Havana Papers has won the 2016 Eric Hoffer Award for best non-fiction ebook. The Eric Hoffer Award honors freethinking writers and independent books of exceptional merit. The “Hoffer” honors books from small, academic, and micro presses, including self-published offering and the grand prize is $2,000.

In addition to the Hoffer award, Daly’s book also won the First Horizon Award, a prize given to the best first-time authors. Michael Daly works as the Quality Assurance Coordinator at Wilfrid Laurier University. He provides support for departments undergoing cyclical reviews and developing new programs, as well as administrating Laurier classroom management processes. Outside of work, Michael Daly is a partner in a production company that writes and records original radio plays for a modern audience.

About The Havana Papers:

With a 1958 portable typewriter in his suitcase, the writer wanders Havana’s crumbling back alleys, bullet-sprayed museums, and grand hotels where the relics of the Revolution and the ghost of Hemingway still speak loudly. 


Whether getting grifted while watching a dubiously-billed piano player from the Buena Vista Social Club, dodging grifters and conmen, or wandering amongst over a million marble graves, The Havana Papers offers a rare glimpse into old Havana—a UNESCO World Heritage site—in the 21st Century. 

When his typewriter breaks in transit, the writer is forced to reconsider his writing holiday and put his novel on hold, until a new story emerges from the vibrance and history in the Old City—Habana Vieja. 

Travel beyond the postcard pictures and vibrant colours of the tourist facade, and into a world forgotten by time’s advance, frozen in a fifties’ imagination, and aching under the strain of modernity. The Havana Papers reveals a complex, contemporary portrait of one of the world’s great historic cities.

The Havana Papers is available for your favourite eReader wherever fine eBooks are sold.

Rebekah Ludolph wins Emerging Scholar Award at Congress 2016

Laurier English and Film Studies doctoral student Rebekah Ludolph was awarded the Barbara Godard Prize for the Best Paper by an Emerging Scholar at a ceremony during the 2016 Congress for the Social Sciences and Humanities at the University of Calgary on Saturday, May 28. Le Prix Barbara-Godard de la meilleure communication par un jeune chercheur is awarded annually by the bilingual Association for Canadian and Quebec Literatures/Association pour Littératures du Canada et Quebec (ACQL/ALCQ) as an acknowledgement of the ongoing legacy of York University’s Canadian literature scholar Barbara Godard, who was a mentor to many students and a leader in the scholarly community. Godard’s own interests in feminist theory, autobiography, and Indigenous women’s writing make the awarding of this prize to Rebekah’s paper of Mohawk author and environmental activist Anahareo especially appropriate and poignant. The award was presented to Rebekah by Dr. Sara Jamieson, President of ACQL/ALCQ and Associate Professor at Carleton University.

Rebekah delivered her paper, titled “Humour, Intersubjectivity, and Indigenous female identity in Anahareo’s Devil in Deerskins” in a special session on Indigeneity, Redemption, Agency on Sunday, May 29 at the University of Calgary. The award-winning paper began as a final essay in EN609: Canadian Women’s Literature offered in Fall 2015 in the Department of English and Film Studies, and Laurier faculty and students saw a preview of the paper when Rebekah delivered it as part of Showcase, the English and Film Studies Graduate Student colloquium, held at Laurier on March 30th.

After receiving the Godard Prize, which includes the opportunity for the paper to be published in the leading scholarly journal Canadian Literature, Rebekah commented: “I am very grateful for this encouragement at the beginning of my PhD journey. My paper would not have taken its current shape without the support of our English department, especially Dr. MacDonald, Dr. Kerber, fellow PhD student Heather Olaveson, my classmates in EN609, and the 2016 EN/FS Department Colloquium.” Supported by a SSHRC doctoral fellowship, Rebekah is studying alternative subjectivities and multicultural texts in Canadian literature. Rebekah Ludolph and Sara Jamieson, Godard Prize 2016

Dr. Sara Jamieson presents Rebekah Ludolph with the Barbara Godard Prize for Best Paper by an Emerging Scholar in Calgary on May 28, 2016.