Spring Convocation 2019

Congratulations to our English and Film Studies graduates…. well done!

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Doctor of Philosophy in English and Film Studies:
Michael McCleary, Supervised by Russ Kilbourn
Claire Meldrum, Supervised by Ken Paradis

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Master of Arts in English:

Mary Cassels
Paige Kappeler
Sarah Mathews
Mary Saleh
Kristen Schiedel
Caroline Weiner

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Bachelor of Arts in English/ Film Studies

Garrett Bernt
Emily Buccioni
Mira Busscher
Tess Campbell
Yelibert Roo
Jenna De Rita
Brianne Carmen
Emily Dychtenberg
Milas Hewson
Natalia Hunter
Brittany Lazar
Christina Lewis
Madeline McInnis
Michael Oliveri
Madeleine Prentice
Amy Robinson
Jennifer Grieve
Adriana Marich
Kailee Mcarthur

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We wish you all the best!

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English & Film Studies: Celebration of Authors, 2019

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On Friday March 22 a sizeable crowd gathered in the Robert Langen Art Gallery in the Waterloo campus library to celebrate the publication of eight books—both academic and creative works—by seven of our faculty members: Sandra Annett’s Anime Fan Communities: Transcultural Flows and Frictions (Palgrave MacMillan 2014); Jing Jing Chang’s Screening Communities: Negotiating Narratives of Empire, Nation, and the Cold War in Hong Kong Cinema (Hong Kong UP 2019); Maria DiCenzo’s Women’s Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1918-1939, co-edited with Catherine Clay, Barbara Green, and Fiona Hackney (Edinburgh UP 2018); Philippa Gates’s Criminalization/Assimilation: Chinese/Americans and Chinatowns in Classical Hollywood Film (Rutgers UP 2019); Russell Kilbourn’s W. G. Sebald’s Postsecular Redemption: Catastrophe With Spectator (Northwestern UP 2018); Tanis MacDonald’s GUSH: Menstrual Manifestos for Our Times, co-edited with Rosanna Deerchild and Ariel Gordon (Frontenac House 2018) and Out of Line: Daring to Be an Artist Outside the Big City (Wolsak and Wynn 2018); Mariam Pirbhai’s Outside People and Other Stories (Innana Publications 2017).

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Wine, beer and assorted snacks fueled the socializing and catching up among EN/FS faculty, graduate and undergraduate students, as well as a number of alumni. The presence of Dean of Arts Richard Nemesvari and University Librarian Gohar Ashoughian contributed to the boisterous mingling. Department chair Tamas Dobozy stepped into his role as MC to introduce each author, each of whom took five minutes to talk about or read from her/his book. The first five authors—Sandy Annett, Jing Jing Chang, Maria DiCenzo, Philippa Gates, and Russell Kilbourn—spoke to their books, all monographs or collections of literary or film criticism, representing the diverse range of scholarship undertaken by our faculty. This section of the event culminated in Tanis MacDonald and Mariam Pirbhai reading from their works of creative non-fiction and fiction, respectively. Both are award-winning authors a well as top-tier academics. In the end the ‘Celebration of Authors’ event amply demonstrated our department’s ongoing commitment to cutting-edge and highly regarded academic scholarship, alongside its emergent investment in creative writing as a significant new dimension of our program offerings.

The Organizers wish to thank the following for their sponsorship of this highly enjoyable event: The Department of English and Film Studies; The Office of the Dean of Arts; The Wilfrid Laurier University Alumni Association; Laurier Bookstore, with a special thanks to Drs. Russell Kilbourn and Philippa Gates for contributing their time to helping organize, fund and advertise the event.

 

Photos by Joanne Buchan

Words in the World: English Symposium 2019

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On February 1, the Department of English and Film Studies held our second annual English Undergraduate Symposium. Following on the heels of last year’s highly-successful event, this year’s symposium, entitled “Words in the World,” organized by Maria DiCenzo and Jenny Kerber, took on the challenge of addressing the many ways in which our discipline intervenes in larger social, political and cultural issues. Our partner in this effort, the English Students’ Society, was instrumental in obtaining matching funding for the event via the Arts Undergraduate Society Grant, making for an ideal partnership between students and faculty, both of which participated in the actual panels of the symposium as well. The attendance and participation from Laurier Brantford English students and faculty further brought together the various strands of English teaching and learning across Laurier’s multiple campuses.

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            The panels were a mix of creative writing and scholarship, exploring (in order) careers in English, life writing and digital media, pop culture and gender and sexuality, literature and sports, creative writing, and current contentious issues.

 

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The symposium was rounded out by this year’s Edna Staebler Writer in Residence, Gary Barwin, who spoke to us over lunch about the strands of influence and technique and collaborations involved in his creative work.

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Last but not least, we had the awarding of the Chris Heard Memorial Prize in creative writing to Yelibert Cruz Roo, for her short story, “This Kingdom has No Heroes,” about barriers to immigration and their effects on families and communities.

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As a whole, the symposium reflected the many intersections between the scholarly and the creative, from found poems taken from interviews with famous sports figures, to works around life writing and personal expression on social media, to the importance of research in crafting historical narratives, to the ways in which skills attained in the classroom can foster careers in areas as wide-ranging as publishing, advertising and the insurance. The symposium demonstrated the many ways in which the study of English enables flexible and adaptive approaches to real-world issues.

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All of the panels were followed by lively question and answer sessions in which students and visitors discussed the many ways in which our discipline engages the “literary” in its widest possible context.

Here’s to hoping for a repeat of this successful event next year.

                          By: Tamas Dobozy, Chair of English and Film Studies

Balderdash Reading: Pamela Mulloy, David Alexander, Sarah YiMei Tsiang, Carrianne Leung

Sanchari Sur, Sarah YiMei Tsiang, Pamela Mulloy, David Alexander, Carrianne Leung

Four delightful writers treated a small, but engaged audience to a marvellous evening of poetry and fiction at the Robert Langen Art Gallery on November 14, 2018.  The event was part of the Balderdash Reading Series organized by PhD candidate, Sanchari Sur.

Pamela Mulloy, the editor of The New Quarterly,read from her new novel, The Deserters. The novel is about the intriguing encounter between Eugenie, a woman trying to run a farm in New Brunswick while her partner is away, and a stranger, whom she has hired to help on the farm. The man, an American soldier, has crossed the border from the U.S. to escape going back to Iraq and has nightmares about his wartime experiences. 

David Alexander, who graduated from Laurier’s English program in the mid 2000s, read from After the Hatching Ovenand Modern Warfare, a chapbook. David has a slight obsession with chickens, and some of the poems he shared included a Blazon describing the body of a rooster, and a found poem made of lines from movies that include the word “chicken.” The word chicken occurs surprisingly often in films.  

Sarah YiMei Tsiang, a poet and children’s picture book writer, is the author of A Flock of Shoes, Sweet Devilry, and has edited Desperately Seeking Susans. She read from her published and unpublished poetry, expressing her love and her concerns about her daughter. In the poem “Two” where her daughter is two years old, Tsiang recalls that they “dance like lovers.” But by the time the daughter is twelve, in a poem called “Twelve,” Tsiang is teaching her how to defend herself.

Carrianne Leung, fiction writer and educator, read from her new collection of linked short stories,That Time I Loved You, which was a finalist of the City of Toronto Book Award in 2018. Leung read a story told from the perspective of twelve-year old June who believes she was in love with a boy in her suburb in Scarborough. Secrets, desires, and wishes, which are understated, reveal themselves in seething and unexpected forms for this observant adolescent. 

An entertaining evening… some questions answered, many insights shared, and much to reflect on.   

By: Eleanor Ty

Welcome MA and PhD Students, 2018-2019

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The Department of English and Film Studies is delighted to welcome our new MA and PhD cohort this fall:

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PhD Student
Roxanne Hearn (WLU)

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MA Students
Alessia Di Cesare (UOttawa)
Laura From (WLU)
Paige Kappeler (WLU)
Heather Lambert (UWaterloo)
Sarah Mathews (WLU)
Kristen Schiedel (WLU)
Denise Springett (WLU)
Leah Waldes (BrockU)
Caroline Weiner (WLU)

 

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The Department held a reception for new and returning students organized by Grad Director Jing Jing Chang held at Wilf’s Den on September 5, 2018 where there was great conversation and good fun.  Best of luck for 2018-2019!

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Classical Hollywood Studies Conference at Laurier

P1090565Laurier’s Film Studies program hosted a major SSHRC-funded conference, Classical Hollywood Studies in the 21st Century, on May 10-13, 2018. Over the course of three days described by some delegates as “summer camp for film academics,” forty leading international scholars convened to exchange cutting-edge ideas about the seminal body of films that were produced by Hollywood’s major studios from the 1920s through the 1960s. These films, known collectively as the classical Hollywood cinema and admired for their stable yet flexible conventions of storytelling and style, have been a central preoccupation of Film Studies ever since the discipline’s emergence in the 1960s. More recently, though, they’ve been evaluated through the fresher lenses, including women’s film history and intermediality studies, among other approaches, and bolstered by new resources such as the Media History Digital Library. A key purpose of the conference was to consider how these new approaches and resources might shape the study of classical cinema in the decades ahead.

Take a moment to check out this splendid conference report, posted as a blog entry by the conference’s keynote speaker, Dr. David Bordwell, Jacques Ledoux Professor of Film Studies, Emeritus, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Bordwell ranks as a preeminent scholar of film studies and one of the most influential writers on classical Hollywood cinema, having co-authored, with Janet Staiger and Kristin Thompson, the canonical text in the field, The Classical Hollywood Cinema: Film Style and Mode of Production to 1960. His keynote talk expanded on material from his most recent book, Reinventing Hollywood: How 1940s Filmmakers Changed Movie Storytelling (aptly described as “magisterial” by Geoffrey O’Brien in the New York Times Review of Books) and revealed his reconsideration of the premises of the canonical co-authored text decades after its publication.

In addition to paper presentations, the conference included a tour of the Film Reference Library at the Toronto International Film Festival Bell Lightbox, a welcome reception at the Princess Café, screenings of the films Letter to Three Wives and Carmen Jones, and an alumni reception at the Apollo Cinema that featured the exceptional catering of The Crazy Canuck.

The conference was organized by Dr. Philippa Gates and Dr. Katherine Spring along with international collaborators Dr. Helen Hanson (University of Exeter) and Dr. Stefan Brandt (University of Graz). Sponsors included the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Apollo Cinema, Princess Cinemas, Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), and the following offices at Laurier: Laurier Alumni, Department of Communication Studies, Department of English and Film Studies, Faculty of Arts, Office of the President and Vice-Chancellor, Office of the Provost and Vice-President: Academic, and Office of Research Services.

Special thanks are owed to five undergraduate students of Film Studies: Paul Tortolo (Conference Secretary), Shaina Weatherhead (videographer), Chance Le Jeune (volunteer), Sam Lawson (volunteer), and Michael Oliveri (volunteer).

By the end of the conference, the most frequent question asked by delegates was, “When can we do this again?” – surely a sign of a smashing success.

By: Katherine Spring

 

Spring Writes: A Celebration of Creative Writing

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Emily Urquhart, Tasneem Jamal, Susan Scott

Spring Writes: A Celebration of Creative Writing was held at Veritas Café on Thursday, March 15th. Hosted by 2018 Edna Staebler Writer in Residence Emily Urquhart, the evening began with an expert panel on the art and ethics of creative non-fiction with Kitchener author Tasneem Jamal, Susan Scott, editor of The New Quarterly, and Emily Urquhart, who also publishes work in this burgeoning literary form. The three panelists engaged in a lively discussion about how to define creative nonfiction – for instance, as ‘true stories told slant’ or as a ‘true novel’ – as well as how to delineate creative nonfiction from straight-up journalistic reporting. Both Jamal and Urquhart trained as journalists, so they had much to say on the latter topic. The panelists also talked about the ethics of writing about family members or other identity groups, and walking the line between telling personal stories and addressing larger social questions. Susan observed that creative nonfiction has the potential to encourage diverse voices who don’t necessarily feel they have a place in Canadian publishing, and offered the hopeful suggestion that these newer stories have the capacity to renew the English language. The panel was timely as the Dept. of English and Film Studies prepares to launch a new course in creative nonfiction next year.

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Katie McGarry

Yeli Cruz
Yeli Cruz

Stephanie Silva
Stephanie Silva

After a short break and some draws for door prizes, attendees were treated to a showcase of Laurier writers curated by WIR Emily Urquhart and Blueprint Magazine. The talent on display ably illustrated the diversity of genres and voices currently represented by Creative Writing at Laurier. Readers included Jenna Hazzard, Katie McGarry, Amy Neufeld, James Lao, Yeli Cruz, and Stephanie Silva. Thank you to these readers for sharing their considerable talents, to Emily for her work as a literary mentor this term, and to all who attended!

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Photos and Story by: Jenny Kerber