Criminalization/Assimilation:Chinese/Americans and Chinatowns in Classical Hollywood Film

Americans #19

Criminalization/Assimilation (March 2019) by Philippa Gates traces how Classical Hollywood films constructed America’s image of Chinese Americans from their criminalization as unwanted immigrants to their eventual acceptance when assimilated citizens, exploiting both America’s yellow peril fears about Chinese immigration and its fascination with Chinatowns. Philippa Gates examines Hollywood’s responses to social issues in Chinatown communities, primarily immigration, racism, drug trafficking, and prostitution, as well as the impact of industry factors including the Production Code and star system on the treatment of those subjects. Looking at over 200 films, Gates reveals the variety of racial representations within American film in the first half of the twentieth century and brings to light not only lost and forgotten films but also the contributions of Asian American actors whose presence onscreen offered important alternatives to Hollywood’s yellowface fabrications of Chinese identity and a resistance to Hollywood’s Orientalist narratives.

New from Rutgers University Press. Order here!

What the critics are saying….

“Philippa Gates takes us on an engrossing journey through the Chinatown streets of Hollywood’s imagination in her comprehensive study of the ambivalent depiction of Chinese people and places on American screens. Her superlative book provides essential reading for scholars, students, and concerned readers who need to understand this history fully to critique the images and ideas that continue to shape today’s cultural landscape.”
–Gina Marchetti, author of Citing China: Politics, Postmodernism, and World Cinema

“Meticulously researched and laudably comprehensive, Criminalization/Assimilationexplores Chinatown’s place in the lexicon of early Hollywood films. This is a unique and important contribution to film studies and Asian American studies—a highly satisfying read!”
–Karla Rae Fuller, author of Hollywood Goes Oriental: CaucAsian Performance in American Film

 

 

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Welcome MA and PhD Students, 2018-2019

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The Department of English and Film Studies is delighted to welcome our new MA and PhD cohort this fall:

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PhD Student
Roxanne Hearn (WLU)

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MA Students
Alessia Di Cesare (UOttawa)
Laura From (WLU)
Paige Kappeler (WLU)
Heather Lambert (UWaterloo)
Sarah Mathews (WLU)
Kristen Schiedel (WLU)
Denise Springett (WLU)
Leah Waldes (BrockU)
Caroline Weiner (WLU)

 

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The Department held a reception for new and returning students organized by Grad Director Jing Jing Chang held at Wilf’s Den on September 5, 2018 where there was great conversation and good fun.  Best of luck for 2018-2019!

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Classical Hollywood Studies Conference at Laurier

P1090565Laurier’s Film Studies program hosted a major SSHRC-funded conference, Classical Hollywood Studies in the 21st Century, on May 10-13, 2018. Over the course of three days described by some delegates as “summer camp for film academics,” forty leading international scholars convened to exchange cutting-edge ideas about the seminal body of films that were produced by Hollywood’s major studios from the 1920s through the 1960s. These films, known collectively as the classical Hollywood cinema and admired for their stable yet flexible conventions of storytelling and style, have been a central preoccupation of Film Studies ever since the discipline’s emergence in the 1960s. More recently, though, they’ve been evaluated through the fresher lenses, including women’s film history and intermediality studies, among other approaches, and bolstered by new resources such as the Media History Digital Library. A key purpose of the conference was to consider how these new approaches and resources might shape the study of classical cinema in the decades ahead.

Take a moment to check out this splendid conference report, posted as a blog entry by the conference’s keynote speaker, Dr. David Bordwell, Jacques Ledoux Professor of Film Studies, Emeritus, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Bordwell ranks as a preeminent scholar of film studies and one of the most influential writers on classical Hollywood cinema, having co-authored, with Janet Staiger and Kristin Thompson, the canonical text in the field, The Classical Hollywood Cinema: Film Style and Mode of Production to 1960. His keynote talk expanded on material from his most recent book, Reinventing Hollywood: How 1940s Filmmakers Changed Movie Storytelling (aptly described as “magisterial” by Geoffrey O’Brien in the New York Times Review of Books) and revealed his reconsideration of the premises of the canonical co-authored text decades after its publication.

In addition to paper presentations, the conference included a tour of the Film Reference Library at the Toronto International Film Festival Bell Lightbox, a welcome reception at the Princess Café, screenings of the films Letter to Three Wives and Carmen Jones, and an alumni reception at the Apollo Cinema that featured the exceptional catering of The Crazy Canuck.

The conference was organized by Dr. Philippa Gates and Dr. Katherine Spring along with international collaborators Dr. Helen Hanson (University of Exeter) and Dr. Stefan Brandt (University of Graz). Sponsors included the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Apollo Cinema, Princess Cinemas, Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), and the following offices at Laurier: Laurier Alumni, Department of Communication Studies, Department of English and Film Studies, Faculty of Arts, Office of the President and Vice-Chancellor, Office of the Provost and Vice-President: Academic, and Office of Research Services.

Special thanks are owed to five undergraduate students of Film Studies: Paul Tortolo (Conference Secretary), Shaina Weatherhead (videographer), Chance Le Jeune (volunteer), Sam Lawson (volunteer), and Michael Oliveri (volunteer).

By the end of the conference, the most frequent question asked by delegates was, “When can we do this again?” – surely a sign of a smashing success.

By: Katherine Spring

 

English and Film Program Award Winners, 2017-18

Congratulations to all the students in English and Film Studies who have won departmental awards and scholarships this year! The list of award recipients is as follows:

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Sam Lawson

Campbell/Verduyn Prize for Film: Samantha Lawson  

Jim Clark Prize for Drama: Liam Mcintosh

Jenna Hazzard
Jenna Hazzard

Chris Heard Memorial Writing Prize: Jenna Hazzard

Pauline Carole Leavine Scholarships in English: Erin McHarge, Caroline Weiner, Emily Merlihan

 

Kooh Mitchell
Mitchell Kooh

Hugh MacLachlan Scholarship: Mitchell Kooh

Barbara Parker Memorial Scholarship: Breanna Perrin

Madeline McInnes (L. Sarazin)
Madeline McInnis (Photo by Luke Sarazin)

Princess Cinema Award: Madeline McInnis

 

Denise Springett
Denise Springett

Flora Roy Scholarships: Stephanie Silva, Emily Merlihan, Erin McHarge, Denise Springett, Caroline Weiner

Paul Tiessen Scholarship in Film: Amanda McKelvey

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Stephanie Silva

Weldon and Misser Prize in Poetry: Stephanie Silva

Compiled by Joanne Buchan

 

Student Success: Mynt Marsellus

Mynt Marsellus

Mynt Marsellus, who graduated with a Film Studies Major and a Minor in Women and Gender Studies in 2017, has published an article that he wrote for an undergraduate course, FS 257 The Western, taught by Dr. Philippa Gates.

The article is entitled, “The Zombie Apocalypse as 21st Century Frontier” in Film Matters 8.3 (Winter 2017): 42-46.

You can check it out here.

Well done, Mynt.

LUJA Launch 2017

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Over 40 students and faculty members attended the launch of the new issue of Laurier Undergraduate Journal of the Arts on October 25, 2017 at the Robert Langen Gallery in the library.  A number of English and Film Studies students served on the management board responsible for the first issue of 2017.  They included: Mitchell Kooh, Mynt Marsellus, Esther Brockett, Brittney Tessier, Carina Rampelt, Madeline McInnis, and Vidish Parikh.  This issue includes articles on a wide range of topics, including, Disney films Wall-E and Tangled,  Tomson Highway,  the repatriation program used by International organizations,  changing demographics in Japan,  the constructedness of female orgasms, and non-binary identities. Mynt Marsellus noted that LUJA received over 200 submissions, and it was difficult for the editors to choose ten essays.

Richard Nemesvari, the Dean of Arts, expressed his delight and approbation of extra-curricular activities such as LUJA because they were a good form of experiential learning and a testament to the intellectual work happening at Laurier.

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Organizer and this year’s Editor, Angela James welcomed the new crew who would take over the Management of LUJA.

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It was an enjoyable evening, with good food, exquisite music, and even prizes for the audience.

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LUJA is funded by the Arts Undergraduate Society at Laurier.

Photos and  story by Eleanor Ty

 

Welcome MA and PhD Students 2017

 

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Photo by Eleanor Ty

The Department of English and Film Studies is delighted to welcome our new MA and PhD cohort this fall who have come to us from near and far:

PhD students

Melissa Brennan (University of New Brunswick)

Julia Empey (McMaster University)

Brendan Pinkofsky (WLU, Dalhousie – King’s College)

 

MA

Jamie Brewer (Brock [BEd], WLU)

Amanda Burrows-Peterson (Toronto [BA English], Concordia [BA History])

Tess Clark (WLU)

Alex Coleman (WLU)

Joseph Coot (Minnesota State)

Roxanne Hearn (York)

Azaan Khamis (WLU)

Mary Saleh (Tishreen Univ. [Syria])

Rachel Schryver (WLU)

Lubna Umar (Univ. Delhi)

Kevin Wallace (WLU)

The Department held a reception for new students organized by Grad Director Jing Jing Chang held at Veritas in mid-September where there was good conversation and good fun.  Best of luck for 2017-2018!

Photos courtesy of Jing Jing Chang