Fall Convocation 2018: PhD and MA in English

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Congratulations to Sarah Rangaratnam, awarded Doctor of Philosophy in English and Film Studies.
Dissertation: Girls’ Voices of the Eighteenth Century: The Development of a Genre for Young Female Readers, 1740-1800.
Advisor: Eleanor Ty

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Congratulations, Roxanne Hearn, awarded MA in English.
Roxanne is continuing her studies, starting her first year PhD at Laurier.

 

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Congratulations, Rachel Schryver, awarded MA in English. Rachel received the Award for Outstanding Graduate Work at convocation.
She is currently employed at Laurier’s Communications, Public Affairs and Marketing office where she did her Practicum in the spring.

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Congratulations, Dawn Matthew, awarded MA in English.
Dawn works at Laurier Library in Interlibrary and User Services.

 

Story and 3 Photos by Eleanor Ty.

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Student Success: Mynt Marsellus

Mynt Marsellus

Mynt Marsellus, who graduated with a Film Studies Major and a Minor in Women and Gender Studies in 2017, has published an article that he wrote for an undergraduate course, FS 257 The Western, taught by Dr. Philippa Gates.

The article is entitled, “The Zombie Apocalypse as 21st Century Frontier” in Film Matters 8.3 (Winter 2017): 42-46.

You can check it out here.

Well done, Mynt.

LUJA Launch 2017

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Over 40 students and faculty members attended the launch of the new issue of Laurier Undergraduate Journal of the Arts on October 25, 2017 at the Robert Langen Gallery in the library.  A number of English and Film Studies students served on the management board responsible for the first issue of 2017.  They included: Mitchell Kooh, Mynt Marsellus, Esther Brockett, Brittney Tessier, Carina Rampelt, Madeline McInnis, and Vidish Parikh.  This issue includes articles on a wide range of topics, including, Disney films Wall-E and Tangled,  Tomson Highway,  the repatriation program used by International organizations,  changing demographics in Japan,  the constructedness of female orgasms, and non-binary identities. Mynt Marsellus noted that LUJA received over 200 submissions, and it was difficult for the editors to choose ten essays.

Richard Nemesvari, the Dean of Arts, expressed his delight and approbation of extra-curricular activities such as LUJA because they were a good form of experiential learning and a testament to the intellectual work happening at Laurier.

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Organizer and this year’s Editor, Angela James welcomed the new crew who would take over the Management of LUJA.

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It was an enjoyable evening, with good food, exquisite music, and even prizes for the audience.

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LUJA is funded by the Arts Undergraduate Society at Laurier.

Photos and  story by Eleanor Ty

 

Officially Dr. Anders Bergstrom!

Anders graduation IMG_4045Anders Bergstrom received his PhD at the June 12, 2017 convocation and his  dissertation, entitled In Search of Lost Selves: Memory and Subjectivity in Transnational Art Cinema received the Award for Outstanding Work at the Graduate Level.

Anders’ dissertation addresses the thorny topic of the subject, that philosophical category central to conceptions of self and identity that emerged in the modern, post-classical era, but which has been placed under interrogation, if not wholly discarded, in contemporary discourses. This project offers an answer for why this term and related concepts persist and manifest in contemporary cultural forms such as the narrative film, in the representation and materialization of memory within. Through analysis and discussion of examples drawn from contemporary transnational cinema—including, among others, The Tree of Life (2011), Melancholia (2011), Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives (2010), and Goodbye, Dragon Inn(2003)—the study addresses the role that art cinema practices play and have played in shaping our conceptions of selfhood.

Anders’ PhD was supervised by Dr. Russell J. A. Kilbourn, with Dr. Jing Jing Chang and Dr. Tamas Dobozy serving as committee members.  Dr. John Caruana, from the Department of Philosophy at Ryerson University, attended as the external examiner at his defence.

Anders is in the process of revising his dissertation for publication and continuing to research and teach film studies. He recently taught a course on Hong Kong Cinema this spring at University of Toronto Mississauga, and will be returning to teach a course on East Asian Film at Laurier this fall.

Our best wishes and hearty congratulations to Anders!

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Anders with wife, Rochelle in Paris.


 

Departmental Award Winners 2017

Congratulations to all the students in English and Film Studies who have won departmental awards and scholarships this year! The list of award recipients is as follows:

Campbell/Verduyn Prize for Film: Grace Jansen In De Wal    

Jim Clark Prize for Drama: Brittany Lazar

Chris Heard Memorial Writing Prize: Danielle LeDuc

Pauline Carole Leavine Scholarship in English: Caroline Weiner, Erin McHarge

Hugh MacLachlan Scholarship: Lindsay Meaning

Barbara Parker Memorial Scholarship: Danielle LeDuc, Denise Springett

Princess Cinema Award: Amanda Mckelvey

Flora Roy Scholarships: Erin McHarge, Aaron Rupert, Carina Rampelt

Paul Tiessen Scholarship in Film: Emily Sider

Weldon and Misser Prize in Poetry: Sarah Best

Congratulations, Victoria Kennedy

Victoria Kennedy

On March 10, 2017, Victoria Kennedy successfully defended her doctoral dissertation, Narrative Pleasures and Feminist Politics: Popular Women’s Historical Fiction, 1990-2015. Diana Wallace, the eminent scholar of women’s historical fiction from the University of South Wales, Uk was the external examiner and participated via SKYPE.

Her study contributes to a developing body of work on women’s historical fiction and its significance to feminist discourse. Since historical fiction is one of the most popular genres of the contemporary period, Victoria’s dissertation brings together the discourses of feminist pop culture criticism and theories of feminist historiography to address the tensions between narrative pleasures and feminist politics in some of the most recognizable women’s historical novels of the past twenty-five years, including The Other Boleyn Girl, Outlander, A Great and Terrible Beauty, and Scarlett.

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Victoria Kennedy with Diana Gabaldon

Victoria comments:

Looking back now, I can see that I was drawn to feminism from an early age, though it was not a label that was particularly encouraged or promoted in my youth. It wasn’t until I became a university student that I acquired the vocabulary and confidence to describe my interests and political sensibilities as “feminist.” In my second year as an undergraduate, I discovered women’s writing and feminist literary criticism. This discovery so energized me that I pursued my passion all the way to a Master’s degree at York University, and then back to Laurier as a doctoral student.

Victoria’s PhD was supervised by Dr. Andrea Austin, with the assistance of Dr. Eleanor Ty and Dr. Katherine Bell as committee members. Dr. Alexandra Boutros of the Cultural Studies department served as the internal-external examiner.

Victoria is currently working on expanding and revising her dissertation for publication as a monograph. At the same time, she is turning her focus to historical narratives in visual media. In May she will present a paper entitled “‘We Want the King’: The Crown and Masculinity” at the Popular Culture Association of Canada’s 7th annual conference in Niagara Falls.

Photo and contributions by Victoria Kennedy

Winning Love by Daylight: Students share their love and knowledge of film at full-day WLU Film Symposium

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The Film Studies faculty members extend their hearty congratulations to all of the undergraduate students who presented academic papers and creative works at the annual WLU Film Symposium, held last Friday and organized by the WLU Film Society. Over the course of the day, the audience was treated to a series of intellectually stimulating papers, stunning music videos and movie trailer recreations, astute questions from the audience, and, in the symposium’s final moments, a spontaneous dance party set to the theme song of Sailor Moon. A list of paper presenters is posted below. Many additional students screened work produced for their courses in video editing (FS370 and FS371), with a special presentation of two short films featuring sound editing by FS major Zixuan Lou. Congratulations to all of you!

Chris Luciantonio, Not Good Enough and The Tactile Accessibility of Stop-Motion Animation

Amanda McKelvey, Stereotypes in Masculine Melodrama

Mynt Marsellus, The Walking Dead, Zombies, and Genre Hybridity

Christina Shirley, Utopianism in Les Miserables and La La Land

Samantha Hutchinson, Shakespeare’s Bawdy on the Big Screen

Madeline McInnis, Modern Day Cinema of Attractions

Daniel Gibel, Soldier of Orange to Starship Trooper: The Evolution of Paul Verhoeven as an Auteur

Jonathan Lim, Canadian Identity: Anything but Clearcut

Jacqueline Ouellette, Penny’s Value: Feminist Auteur Puts the Woman in a Refrigerator

Yeng Hang, Mo Lei Tau: Reconsidering Hong Kong’s Despised Genre

Michael Oliveri, Popular Portrayals of Peasants in Battleship Potemkin and Chapaev

Connor Hotzwik, Discussions of Art in Early Film

Amy Holman, Bazin’s Puppets

Breanna Kettles, The Knight Who Doesn’t Slay the Dragon: The Reconciliation of Sci-fi and Fantasy Components in Scrapped Princess

Aruba Khurshid: How to Sell to the West: A Look at Sailor Moon’s Success