Classical Hollywood Studies Conference at Laurier

P1090565Laurier’s Film Studies program hosted a major SSHRC-funded conference, Classical Hollywood Studies in the 21st Century, on May 10-13, 2018. Over the course of three days described by some delegates as “summer camp for film academics,” forty leading international scholars convened to exchange cutting-edge ideas about the seminal body of films that were produced by Hollywood’s major studios from the 1920s through the 1960s. These films, known collectively as the classical Hollywood cinema and admired for their stable yet flexible conventions of storytelling and style, have been a central preoccupation of Film Studies ever since the discipline’s emergence in the 1960s. More recently, though, they’ve been evaluated through the fresher lenses, including women’s film history and intermediality studies, among other approaches, and bolstered by new resources such as the Media History Digital Library. A key purpose of the conference was to consider how these new approaches and resources might shape the study of classical cinema in the decades ahead.

Take a moment to check out this splendid conference report, posted as a blog entry by the conference’s keynote speaker, Dr. David Bordwell, Jacques Ledoux Professor of Film Studies, Emeritus, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Bordwell ranks as a preeminent scholar of film studies and one of the most influential writers on classical Hollywood cinema, having co-authored, with Janet Staiger and Kristin Thompson, the canonical text in the field, The Classical Hollywood Cinema: Film Style and Mode of Production to 1960. His keynote talk expanded on material from his most recent book, Reinventing Hollywood: How 1940s Filmmakers Changed Movie Storytelling (aptly described as “magisterial” by Geoffrey O’Brien in the New York Times Review of Books) and revealed his reconsideration of the premises of the canonical co-authored text decades after its publication.

In addition to paper presentations, the conference included a tour of the Film Reference Library at the Toronto International Film Festival Bell Lightbox, a welcome reception at the Princess Café, screenings of the films Letter to Three Wives and Carmen Jones, and an alumni reception at the Apollo Cinema that featured the exceptional catering of The Crazy Canuck.

The conference was organized by Dr. Philippa Gates and Dr. Katherine Spring along with international collaborators Dr. Helen Hanson (University of Exeter) and Dr. Stefan Brandt (University of Graz). Sponsors included the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Apollo Cinema, Princess Cinemas, Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), and the following offices at Laurier: Laurier Alumni, Department of Communication Studies, Department of English and Film Studies, Faculty of Arts, Office of the President and Vice-Chancellor, Office of the Provost and Vice-President: Academic, and Office of Research Services.

Special thanks are owed to five undergraduate students of Film Studies: Paul Tortolo (Conference Secretary), Shaina Weatherhead (videographer), Chance Le Jeune (volunteer), Sam Lawson (volunteer), and Michael Oliveri (volunteer).

By the end of the conference, the most frequent question asked by delegates was, “When can we do this again?” – surely a sign of a smashing success.

By: Katherine Spring

 

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English and Film Program Award Winners, 2017-18

Congratulations to all the students in English and Film Studies who have won departmental awards and scholarships this year! The list of award recipients is as follows:

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Sam Lawson

Campbell/Verduyn Prize for Film: Samantha Lawson  

Jim Clark Prize for Drama: Liam Mcintosh

Jenna Hazzard
Jenna Hazzard

Chris Heard Memorial Writing Prize: Jenna Hazzard

Pauline Carole Leavine Scholarships in English: Erin McHarge, Caroline Weiner, Emily Merlihan

 

Kooh Mitchell
Mitchell Kooh

Hugh MacLachlan Scholarship: Mitchell Kooh

Barbara Parker Memorial Scholarship: Breanna Perrin

Madeline McInnes (L. Sarazin)
Madeline McInnis (Photo by Luke Sarazin)

Princess Cinema Award: Madeline McInnis

 

Denise Springett
Denise Springett

Flora Roy Scholarships: Stephanie Silva, Emily Merlihan, Erin McHarge, Denise Springett, Caroline Weiner

Paul Tiessen Scholarship in Film: Amanda McKelvey

Silva Stephanie
Stephanie Silva

Weldon and Misser Prize in Poetry: Stephanie Silva

Compiled by Joanne Buchan

 

Steampunk Course DIY Projects

Leah Ramsden

Leah Ramsden

Students in Dr. Andrea Austin’s ‘EN209: Steampunk’ engaged with the DIY aesthetic of the genre by completing makeables for their end-of-term project. While objects needed to be relevant to at least one of the course novels, members of EN209 took a variety of creative approaches, including transforming vintage tea decanters and old clocks into lamps (Leah Ramsden; Alexandra Zonneveld).

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Clock lamp by Alexandra Zonneveld

Other students created original graphic-novel inspired artwork (Taylor Zarudny), and retro-fitted an old mirror for two-way surveillance (Brittany Whelan).

 

Taylor Zarudni

Artwork by Taylor Zarudny

Brittany Whelan

Brittany Whelan

How about using 3D printers to create an original, Victorian-inspired musical instrument (Daniel Wright) and a steampunk-themed treasure box (Roula Karawi)?

Daniel White

Daniel White

Roula Karawi

Roula Karawi

Story submitted by: Andrea Austin

Balderdash Reading with Urquhart, Jong, and Swan

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Tucked inside the Wilfred Laurier Library is the quaint Robert Langen Art Gallery, which on Thursday February 9th was the location for  the Balderdash Reading Series hosted by Sanchari Sur. The Balderdash Reading Series is monthly  event which aims to represent and celebrate culture, art and academics. This was a public reading featuring three talented writers, Emily Urquhart, Tamara Jong, and Dane Swan. At five past seven, the presentation began.

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The first reader, Emily Urquhart, is a non-fiction writer who has received many awards for her work, including the Globe and Mail Best Book 2015, a National Magazine award, BC Book Prize as well as Kobo First Book Award. She is Laurier’s current writer in residence and during Thursday night’s reading, she presented a piece which she said was inspired by the brave students who had came to see her. “If they can do it, well then maybe so can I” she stated. Her piece was new work, still unedited and raw with emotion. The creative non-fiction piece which was an excerpt from an essay she’d been working on was about her brother’s sudden death which haunted her for many years to follow.

The second reader of the night was Tamara Jong, who is a non-fiction writer. Her work has appeared in The New Quarterly, Ricepaper, and Room. She read her short story that she had written four years ago entitled “Kindergarten Tales”. She described the piece as “kind funny and a kinda sad”. The piece ranged from her childhood and the difficulty’s of tying her shoe, to her adult life and her loss of faith.

The last reader of the night, Dane Swan, is a short story writer and poet, he has published two poetry collects and a short story collection. Swan was soft spoken when first walking up to the microphone to introduce himself and his pieces. Yet, once he delved into the pieces, he became passionate, his voice boomed and his hands gestured wildly as he spoke. In one particularly emotional section he yelled out “you!” and pointed an accusing finger at the audience which was very effective. The passion brought his work to life and proved that the poet is his own best sales man.

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After the readings, there was a short Q and A section with the authors. The audience had many questions ranging from their inspiration, difficulty with publishers and their view on other arts. Overall there was a positive reaction from the audience.

Photos and Article by Emma Davis, First Year, English and Film Studies

Outside People By Mariam Pirbhai: Book Launch

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On November 2, 2017, Veritas Café was packed with faculty, students, and members of the community for the launch of Professor Mariam Pirbhai’s collection of short stories, Outside People and Other Stories, published by Inanna Publications in Toronto.

Two student writers opened the evening’s festivities. Jenna Hazzard, whose short story was recently a runner-up in Elle magazine’s national writing competition, read a humorous episode from the opening pages of her novella-in-progress, set in a library just after New Year’s Eve. Jenna’s reading  prompted one longtime library employee to say that she hit the mark with all her details. Kyleen McGragh performed two of her poems, “”Exhale” and “Parasite.” Both poems were recently published in FreeLit magazine, and Kyleen gave a riveting and bold recitation.

 

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Professor Pirbhai graciously thanked her colleagues, students, and especially, her Latin American friends for their support. Her stories, she noted, were about the invisible rather than the “visible” minorities in Canada. They are not just about immigrants, but about the domestic worker, temporary migrant labourers, those who are left behind and whose families are fractured because of globalization.

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She began by reading an excerpt from “Air Raids,” featuring a modern Muslim woman’s would-be sexual encounter with an airline steward during his stopover in Montreal. Set against the backdrop of a protest against a Quebec bill banning religious symbols, the story is rich with the voices of English, French, Pakistani, Jewish, and Arabic people.

Her second excerpt, “Chicken Catchers,” was based on the horrific car accident which killed ten migrant workers and the truck driver near Stratford in the winter of 2012. The victims were from Peru, five who had only recently arrived. Pirbhai’s story focuses on the inter-ethnic friendship between a Peruvian and a Jamaican worker, and may lead us to question Canadian habits of consuming chicken, particularly our preference for chicken breasts.

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She ended with a funny story, “Crossing Over,” about a woman from Mumbai’s consternation about having to perform inelegant and unfeminine manoeuvers in the family car in order to attend a dinner party in Halifax in winter.

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Outside People has been praised as a “stunning debut.”

Photos and Story by Eleanor Ty

LUJA Launch 2017

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Over 40 students and faculty members attended the launch of the new issue of Laurier Undergraduate Journal of the Arts on October 25, 2017 at the Robert Langen Gallery in the library.  A number of English and Film Studies students served on the management board responsible for the first issue of 2017.  They included: Mitchell Kooh, Mynt Marsellus, Esther Brockett, Brittney Tessier, Carina Rampelt, Madeline McInnis, and Vidish Parikh.  This issue includes articles on a wide range of topics, including, Disney films Wall-E and Tangled,  Tomson Highway,  the repatriation program used by International organizations,  changing demographics in Japan,  the constructedness of female orgasms, and non-binary identities. Mynt Marsellus noted that LUJA received over 200 submissions, and it was difficult for the editors to choose ten essays.

Richard Nemesvari, the Dean of Arts, expressed his delight and approbation of extra-curricular activities such as LUJA because they were a good form of experiential learning and a testament to the intellectual work happening at Laurier.

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Organizer and this year’s Editor, Angela James welcomed the new crew who would take over the Management of LUJA.

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It was an enjoyable evening, with good food, exquisite music, and even prizes for the audience.

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LUJA is funded by the Arts Undergraduate Society at Laurier.

Photos and  story by Eleanor Ty

 

English Students “Meet the Profs” Night

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Laurier’s English Students Association organized a “Meet the Profs” night at the Hawk’s Nest on Monday, October 2, 2017.

A literary guessing game was organized by Manreet Lachhar and co-VP of Events, Tess Campbell. The names of well-known literary texts and characters were supposed to be very familiar, but managed to stump a few professors and our Dean of Arts.

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Student Association President Chance LeJeune welcomed everyone and there were treats and special way to make s’mores.  A few brave souls dressed up for the photo booth.

It was a fun gathering and a nice way to meet students and colleagues.

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Photos courtesy of Mhairi Chandler.